Accutane | Roaccutane | Accutane Side Effects | Isotretinoin Helpful Tips

Accutane | Roaccutane | Accutane Side Effects | Isotretinoin Helpful Tips

Accutane or Roaccutane. This video is on common side effects of Isotretinoin, tips and tricks to help reduce them.

Whether you call it isotretinoin, roaccutane or Accutane I’m going to give you some helpful tips everyone should know whilst taking it.

Please remember that some of the side effects associated with isotretinoin can be pretty severe which is why before anyone begins taking it, it’s always recommend to first read the fact sheet on it by the British association of dermatologists I would recommend everyone to read this fully:

I’ve included more information on Isotretinoin below, however this is not a detailed list. For more information please visit the following links:

https://patient.info/medicine/isotretinoin-capsules-for-acne-roaccutane
%20Information%20Leaflet.pdf

ISOTRETINOIN KEY FACTS:
• Isotretinoin capsules start to work after a week to 10 days.
• Isotretinoin capsules work very well – 4 out of 5 people who use them have clear skin after 4 months.
• Your skin may become very dry and sensitive to sunlight during treatment. Using lip balm and moisturisers will help.
• If you’re a woman, it’s very important not to become pregnant while using isotretinoin capsules and for at least 1 month after stopping. This is because isotretinoin can harm an unborn baby.
Isotretinoin capsules are also called by the brand names such as Accutane Roaccutane and Rizuderm.

WHO CAN AND CAN’T TAKE ISOTRETINOIN:
Isotretinoin capsules are for teenagers and adults with severe acne. Do not give isotretinoin capsules to children under the age of 12 years or before puberty.

Do not take isotretinoin capsules if you:

• Have had an allergic reaction to isotretinoin, soya (the capsules contain soya) or any other medicines in the past
• Have an inherited digestive disorder called fructose intolerance (the capsules contain sorbitol)

To make sure isotretinoin capsules are safe for you, tell your doctor if you:

• Have had a mental health illness like depression
• Are pregnant or think you could be, or you’re breastfeeding
have ever had an allergic reaction to isotretinoin or any other medicine
• Have liver or kidney disease
• Have high levels of cholesterol or other fats in your blood
• Have high levels of vitamin A
• Have Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis

If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor before beginning treatment with isotretinoin capsules.

ADVICE FOR WOMEN
This medicine is likely to harm a baby. It also increases the risk of miscarriage.

If you become pregnant during treatment with isotretinoin capsules, stop taking the capsules and tell your doctor as soon as possible.

It’s very important that you do not get pregnant while you’re taking isotretinoin capsules. You’ll be asked by your doctor to follow strict rules to prevent pregnancy during treatment and for 1 month afterwards.

Before starting treatment with isotretinoin capsules, women who are able to become pregnant must agree to:

•Use at least 1, and ideally 2, reliable methods of contraception for 1 month before starting isotretinoin capsules, and for 1 month after treatment has stopped – the second contraceptive should be a barrier method of contraception (for example, a condom), but you shouldn’t use barrier methods on their own
• Have a pregnancy test before, during, and 5 weeks after the end of treatment – some doctors may ask you to have monthly pregnancy tests

Do not breastfeed while you’re using isotretinoin capsules. This medicine can get into breast milk and harm your baby.

Do not take isotretinoin capsules if you think you’re pregnant, you know you’re pregnant, or if you’re breastfeeding.

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ABOUT ME:
Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every Week – Monday 4PM(GMT).

I’m a British – Persian – Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy.

DISCLAIMER:
This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.

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